Demographics Of London Population Suffering From Different Heart Diseases


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The London population is growing, and with that comes an increase in the number of people who are diagnosed with heart disease. There are many factors that contribute to this diagnosis, but one thing is certain: it doesn’t discriminate. This article will outline the different demographics within the London population and how they correspond to heart disease diagnoses.

Heart Disease Diagnoses Among The Elderly

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From 2008-2012, there has been a 5% increase in those aged 65 years or older being diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases compared to 2007-2011 (OECD). These numbers show that as we age our odds of developing these illnesses increases. Additionally, due to less physical activity as we grow older; our chance of developing diabetes also increases which can lead to cardiovascular diseases (OECD). Of those elderly who suffer from heart disease, the rate of women living with it is higher than men by 13% nationally. Women also tend to be at a greater risk for developing high blood pressure and high cholesterol (American Heart Association 1).   

Heart Disease Diagnoses Among The Middle-Aged

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From 2008-2012 there has been no change in the number of diagnoses among those between 45-64 years old. This age range contains people who are still in the workforce and have lifestyles that can contribute to these illnesses. As far as gender goes, this age bracket shows equal rates for both males and females diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (OECD). However, men are more likely to die from it than women (Bourgeault). In addition, those who are currently unemployed have a rate of developing heart disease that is 68% higher than those who are working.

Heart Disease Diagnoses Among The Young

From 2008-to 2012 the number of diagnoses among those between 15-44 years old has been on a decline. However, there is a disparity between genders as males have a much greater chance of being diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases than females (OECD). This can be explained by the different lifestyles people lead in this age range; mainly because females tend to make healthy choices more often than their male counterparts which leads to lower rates of smoking and obesity (American Heart Association 1). Additionally, researchers claim it may not be due to the lifestyles they lead but the fact that men are less likely to seek out medical attention.

Heart Disease Diagnoses Among The Working Class

From 2008-2012 there has been no change in the number of heart disease diagnoses among working-class citizens aged 45-64 years old. This group contains people who are working 40 hours or more per week, which can cause an increase in stress levels and blood pressure (American Heart Association 1). It is also common for them to have poor eating habits which lead to obesity, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Also, due to their jobs, they are often exposed to fumes and chemicals which increase their risk of developing lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) (Million Hearts).

Heart Disease Diagnoses Among The Unemployed

From 2008-2012 there has been no change in the number of heart disease diagnoses among unemployed citizens aged 45-64 years old. This group is more likely than not to be male and between 35-44 years old (OECD). However, unemployment doesn’t only equal an increase in stress but also an increase in smoking, alcohol consumption, and unhealthy eating habits (American Heart Association 1). Researchers claim that many don’t seek medical attention right away because they feel as though this will not affect them or think it’s due to age.  

Conclusion

The heart diseases that are the most common in the London population are coronary artery disease, angina, and myocardial infarction. The study showed that there is a correlation between ethnicity and heart disease prevalence. For example, South Asian people are more likely to have a heart attack than white people. This information can be used by doctors and other health professionals when they are providing care for patients with heart disease. It is important to take into account the patient’s ethnic background when diagnosing and treating a heart condition.

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